Keynote Lecture Freitag

Die Keynote Lectures zählen zu den besonderen Highlights des Programms. In halbstündigen Vorträgen stellen herausragende Experten wichtige Themen in umfassender Weise dar.

Prof. Robert MacLaren, Oxford, GB

 
engl
von Graefe Saal 11:30 - 12:00 02.10.2015
Keynote Lecture Fr16
Developing new gene and stem cell therapies for retinal disease
Vorsitzende/r: Robert MacLaren (Oxford)

Retinal gene and stem cell therapies are now being applied to treat retinal diseases in a number of clinical trials worldwide. Certain diseases are more likely to be treatable than others, but there is the real possibility of reversing blindness in patients with complete photoreceptor loss. Now is the time for ophthalmologists to engage with this technology to bring it into the clinic.   Robert MacLaren is Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Oxford and Consultant Ophthalmologist at the Oxford Eye Hospital. He specialized first in Oxford and then moved to Moorfields Eye Hospital in London, where he was a Consultant Vitreoretinal Surgeon and led research into age-related macular degeneration. He returned to Oxford as Professor of Ophthalmology in 2009 and currently leads a research team in the Nuffield Laboratory of Ophthalmology. His clinical and laboratory research is dedicated to finding new treatments for blindness, particularly in patients with incurable retinal diseases, using stem cell-based approaches, gene therapy or electronic retinas. Professor MacLaren’s key research achievements include first results in gene therapy clinical trial for choroideremia which have been published in The Lancet. He is also developing new techniques for cataract and retinal surgery.
Organisator: Karl Ulrich Bartz-Schmidt (Tübingen)
Referent/in: Robert MacLaren (Oxford)
Retinal gene and stem cell therapies are now being applied to treat retinal diseases in a number of clinical trials worldwide. Certain diseases are more likely to be treatable than others, but there is the real possibility of reversing blindness in patients with complete photoreceptor loss. Now is the time for ophthalmologists to engage with this technology to bring it into the clinic.